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Shepherdstown Film Society announces slate

January 18, 2013
Shepherdstown Chronicle

The Shepherdstown Film Society is pleased to announce its spring, 2013 series. This season continues the partnership with the Scarborough Society of Shepherd University. This partnership gives the Shepherdstown Film Society the financial support it needs to maintain its commitment to show free films for Shepherd students and faculty, and the Shepherdstown community.

Five films will be presented, starting on Jan. 25 and running through April 19. Three films comprise the spring theme "Island Films" Two films are presented in conjunction with Shepherd University programs.

All films will be shown on Fridays. All showings are at 7 p.m. in Shepherd University's Reynolds Hall. As with all the Society's films, admission will be free and each showing will be followed by a discussion. An opening night reception at The War Memorial Building will kick off the series from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 25.

More information on each film can be found on the Society's website at www.shepherdstownfilmsociety.org. The film schedule will be as follows: Jan. 25: "Mediterraneo"; Feb. 8: "Something the Lord Made"; Feb. 15: "Round Midnight"; March 8: "Swept Away"; and April 20: "The Wicker Man."

Details of the films follow below, in the order in which the films are being shown:

Jan. 25 "Mediterraneo" (Italy, 1991, 90 minutes, directed by Gabriele Salvatores). This Academy Award winner for best foreign language film of 1991 tells of an Italian army unit posted to a small Greek island during World War II. When the transport that would take them back to harms way is lost, their lonely outpost becomes a heaven on earth. Wary islanders come out of hiding and the order of the day becomes make love, not war. Come see the warm, blue sea and sky of the Aegean and banish the mid-winter cold. Rated R for sexuality, language and drug content.

Feb. 8: "Something the Lord Made" (USA, 2004, 110 minutes, directed by Joseph Sargent). A pioneer heart surgeon and his African-American lab technician make waves in the mid-20th century medical establishment by their unusual collaboration at Johns Hopkins University Hospital. Together they develop surgical techniques to cure Blue Baby Syndrome. This film is a special presentation in conjunction with Shepherd University's Common Reading program. It is not rated. Post-film discussion led by Dr. Heidi Hanrahan, Assistant Professor of English at Shepherd University.

Feb. 15: "Round Midnight" (France/USA, 1986, 130 minutes, directed by Bertrand Tavernier). A fictional jazz musician, played by legendary tenor sax player Dexter Gordon, is losing his battle with alcoholism in the 1950s New York jazz scene. An offer to play in France provides a respite from all that is wrong in his life. The welcoming spirit of Paris and new friendships kindle a brief renewal of his musical gifts. Herbie Hancock won an Academy Award for best original score for this film. The film title is taken from a jazz standard by pianist Thelonious Monk. This is a special presentation in conjunction with Shepherd University's Black History Month programs and is co-sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs. Rated R for language and sexual themes.

March 8: "Swept Away" (Italy, 1974, 116 minutes, directed by Lina Wertmuller). Director and screenwriter Lina Wertmuller sets up a dialectic between a wealthy right-wing socialite and one of the crewmen on her yacht, a true-red communist. Fate sweeps them away from all the conventional moorings of life and shipwrecks them on an uninhabited island. Verbal and physical battles exercise their beliefs and emotions as they struggle to survive. Rated R for sexual situations, nudity, violence and language.

April 19: "The Wicker Man" (UK, 1973, 88 minutes, directed by Robin Hardy). A young girl is missing, or maybe not, on the Scottish island of Summerisle. Police Detective Sgt. Howie arrives from the mainland to investigate and finds a community not to his liking. The natives have gone native, returning to old pagan Celtic religious rituals. Howie's attempts to unravel the mysteries of the island lead to more and more convolutions. Rated R for sexual situations, nudity and violence. Post-film discussion led by Dr. Rachel Krantz, Associate Professor of French at Shepherd University.

For further information about the Society and its films, visit their website or contact Lisa Welch at 304-876-1837 (email lmwelch@frontiernet.net) or Mina Goodrich at 304-876-2159.

 
 

 

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